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Attorneys For Today, Counselors For Life

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Attorneys For Today, Counselors For Life

Attorneys For Today, Counselors For Life

Metz, Bailey & McLoughlin provides customized estate planning and business law services to clients throughout Ohio

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Advance directives: What happens if you become incapacitated?

On Behalf of | May 19, 2021 | estate planning | 0 comments

An Ohio estate plan can ensure your beneficiaries receive your assets according to your wishes after you pass away. Another benefit is that you can use it for documenting your preferences for end-of-life care.

According to the Ohio Hospital Association, advance directives are a critical part of advance care planning. These powerful tools state your preferences regarding your healthcare if you become incapacitated. Various documents help cover different situations that may arise. The two most common advance directives are a living will and durable power of attorney.

Living will

If you become permanently unconscious or terminally ill, this document contains your wishes regarding treatment options. It can address life-prolonging procedures, such as life support, dialysis and tube feeding. You can also specify the types of medical treatments you do or do not want. These can include do not resuscitate orders that instruct healthcare providers not to take extraordinary measures if your breathing or heart stops.

Health care power of attorney

This document identifies the person you select to make medical decisions on your behalf when you cannot. They become your advocate, making sure you receive the type of care you would choose for yourself. It’s critical that you discuss your preferences with the person you select while you are still in good health. This person should be someone you trust to carry out your wishes and who will fight for your rights.

A comprehensive estate plan that includes advance directives can help making difficult decisions easier on your loved ones. Setting up trusts, succession planning and asset protection can help minimize probate costs and reduce contention between family members after you die.